Imaging Facility Team

Andrew Jefferson

I am the Facility Manager at Micron, where I assist with user training, troubleshooting and maintaining the equipment and facilities. I first became involved with microscopy at the Molecular Cytogenetics and Microscopy Core at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics in Oxford, where I completed my D.Phil and also assisted in the running of the microscopy facility. I have completed post-doctoral research positions at the University of Arizona and at the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine in Oxford, both heavily involved with light microscopy and imaging. Prior to joining the Department of Biochemistry I was a lab manager at the Dunn School of Pathology where I also assisted with the Bioimaging Facility which is part of Micron.


email:andrew.jefferson@bioch.ox.ac.uk

Carina Monico

Carina has several years of experience in molecular biology, single-molecule biophysics and optics. After finishing her studies in pure Biology at the University of Coimbra, she did her PhD and first postdoc at the European Laboratory of Non-Linear Spectroscopy (LENS) in Florence. At LENS she combined dual optical tweezers, fluorescence imaging and microfluidics to study gene expression and regulation at the single molecule level. Then she moved to the Chemistry Department at the University of Oxford and King's College London for a postdoc in cell membrane biophysics. There she built several bespoke fluorescence microscopes suitable for TIRFM, widefield microscopy, polarisation, FRAP, smFRET and live cell applications. She is now the assistant manager at Micron. Come and meet her for any advice in terms of basic and advanced microscopy, sample preparation and experiment design.


Carina is currently on parental leave. For all enquiries please contact Andrew or Nadia

Nadia Halidi

Nadia joined Micron in September 2018 as assistant facility manager. She assists with training new users, troubleshooting, maintaining and developing the equipment at the facility with a focus on super-resolution and confocal microscopy.

Nadia received her MSc in physics and chemistry from the University of Pécs, Hungary and holds a Ph.D. in biophysics from the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland. Her graduate work focused on elucidating the mechanisms of intra- and intercellular calcium wave propagation and cell-cell communication between arterial smooth muscle cells. She then moved to Harvard Medical School as a postdoctoral fellow, where she investigated the effect of the mechanical environment on RhoGTPase signaling during cell migration. Before Micron, Nadia was a postdoc at NDORMS, Uni. Oxford focusing on the influence of bone marrow adipocytes on breast cancer metastasis using 2D and 3D microenvironments and developing image-based assays to validate in-cell efficacy of new probes and inhibitors, provided by the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC). While at NDORMS, Nadia also managed the Botnar Bioimaging facility.


Publication Profile


email: nadia.halidi@bioch.ox.ac.uk 

Richard Parton

I work in the Davis lab using state-of-the-art and advanced imaging techniques as well as developing improved imaging methods and quantitative image analysis to investigate the molecular mechanism of RNA transport in Drosophila tissues. 

During my own work and through collaborations I have gained considerable experience with quantitative live cell imaging and image analysis applied to a variety of biological systems and questions working in collaboration together with researchers with Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry backgrounds. I have a special interest in dynamic cell activities at the single and multi cell level with respect to the determination of cell and tissue growth and development. In addition to my research projects, part of my role is to provide technical advice and imaging support to other researchers and students.



email:richard.parton@bioch.ox.ac.uk

Alan Wainman

I am a Post-doc in the Dunn School of Pathology where I look after the light microscopes. I'm also a Post-doc in Jordan Raff's lab where I am interested in understanding how a cell can cope with either too few centrosomes or too many. For training and access to the Dunn School microscopes send me an email.


e-mail: alan.wainman@path.ox.ac.uk